GDPR and Ends. An overview

GDPR and Ends. An overview

Amongst GDPR protective intent is a wealth of endings. It requires, expects and encourages endings to happen for consumer data. How this happens though is to be designed and delivered by service providers. Yet many providers care little about this aspect of the consumer lifecycle and overlook its importance to the brand and long term perception of a company.

GDPR...aargh! Consent and consent removal. #2

GDPR...aargh! Consent and consent removal. #2

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)  states that “Consent must be clear and distinguishable from other matters and provided in an intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language”. This promises to be a vast improvement on the current consumer experience! A far more notable, and some would say, controversial aspect of the legislation is the expectation that it must be “as easy to withdraw consent as it is to give it”. This suggests that it provides an effective method for consumers to off-board and end their service relationship.

Is there no end to the Circular Economy?

Is there no end to the Circular Economy?

As the Black Friday narrative of “Consume More!” comes and goes again, it predictably ignites the counterpoint argument in many of us concerned about the pace of human consumption.

Reading articles along this theme, I am mixed with emotions of encouragement — that we are dealing with the problems of over consumption, and concern that we use the same tired story of guilt, bad big business and systematic failure. Its not that these arguments are wrong, its just they are not part of the consumer’s experience. The real failing is that the consumer experience is an incomplete story. And until the story has an emotional ending, this is not going to change.

T&Cs on Ts. The assumed guilt of the user.

T&Cs on Ts. The assumed guilt of the user.

“Apple reserves the right to disband a Family in accordance with the “Termination” section of this Agreement.“ 

I found this example so funny, I wanted to make a kids t-shirt out of it. I hoped people would take a second look at the t-shirt on the beach while my kids wore it on their summer holidays. Maybe it would strike up a conversation. Maybe they would think about what it said. Maybe they wouldn’t look, and carry on, like we do when we tick Ts&Cs.

Being put to death by Google should be a good thing

Being put to death by Google should be a good thing

I don’t tend to punch guests as they leave the party, but some companies do the metaphorical equivalent. Not saying goodbye graciously can create a terrible reputation with your customers, and party goers. Now, I could drag up the usual suspects of big old corporations that fail to create amicable endings with their customers but I want to talk about start-ups, and the tech industry, who are sadly drifting down the path of short-termism that we usually associate with the financial services industry.